Brigadier General Chuck Yeager left ‘a legacy of strength, adventure, and patriotism’

Brigadier General Chuck Yeager left ‘a legacy of strength, adventure, and patriotism’

Chuck Yeager

Before there was a U.S. Space Force, there was a U.S. Air Force and before that there was the Army Air Corps and a genuine American hero by the name of Chuck Yeager. He passed away on December 7, Pearl Harbor Day, with not enough fanfare. Oh, there were news reports about his death at the age of 97, but not enough of a sendoff for someone who did what he did with his life. Perhaps it was because the COVID crisis was taking up so much of the media’s time; or maybe it was because it’s not in fashion these days to celebrate the accomplishments of daring, gallant, stout-hearted men like Brigadier General Yeager.

Charles Elwood Yeager had what author Tom Wolfe called “The Right Stuff.” He enlisted in the U.S. Army in September of 1941 and distinguished himself right from the get-go.

Private Yeager was assigned to what was then called the Army Air Corps. In 1943 he received his commission as a reserve flight officer and was assigned as a fighter pilot in the Eighth Air Force stationed in England. It was the height of World War II and in the ensuing years he flew 64 missions over Europe, shooting down no less than 13 enemy aircraft. It was reported that five of those dog fights took place in one day and, in the end, he even downed a Nazi jet fighter, one of the first of its kind on either side of the hostilities.

 

 

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